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BOS Foundation Rescues Another Baby Orangutan

BOS Foundation Rescues Another Baby Orangutan

 

Tragically, orphaned orangutans continue to arrive and on August 27, BOS Foundation and the Central Kalimantan BKSDA rescued a 2-year-old male orangutan from Habungen, a traditional gold mine in the Banama Tingang sub-district of Pulang Pisau Regency, Central Kalimantan. Avillager from Sepang, Gunung Mas Regency, had reported information on the orangutan to the Central Kalimantan BKSDA. The villager said that he found the baby on the side of a track leading to the mine. Scared and alone, it was evident that his mother had been killed.

Upon rescue, the baby was exhausted and weak, with a badly injured left arm. The Nyaru Menteng medical team conducted a full health examination, with X-rays revealing the baby’s swollen left wrist was fractured. His wound was thought to have been inflicted by a sharp instrument, such as a serampang, a local Dayak pitchfork.

An X-ray revealed a fractured left wrist

The baby is now undergoing intensive care and monitoring under our team of dedicated veterinarians and babysitters. Weighing just 4.4 kg, the baby will remain in quarantine for at least two months before he can join the other babies in the Nursery Group.

Our hearts go out to this little boy. We hope he gets better soon, so he can join the 16 other infants and toddlers in our new Baby House.

Text by: BOS Foundation HQ Communication Team 

You can make a difference right now and help save orangutans! DONATE NOW

PRM Team Observes Trio in Kehje Sewen

Our PRM team in the Kehje Sewen Forest recently set out on a patrol in the hope of locating several orangutans that had gone unobserved for a while. The team were able to pick up Signe’s signal, and shortly after spotted her with her son, Bungaran, sitting atop a tree eating fruit.

Signe and Bungaran enjoy the bark

The mother-child pair looked healthy; Bungaran was seen actively moving from one branch to another, with Signe keeping a watchful eye over him while she enjoyed some ficus fruits. Every now and then, Bungaran approached his mother to request fruit. The PRM team’s presence did not seem to bother them much, and after a while Bungan joined them. The trio then spent the rest of the day together.

Bungan comes to join with Signe and Bungaran

In the late afternoon, clouds began to envelope the sky, and soon the rain came pouring down on the forest. From a distance, the PRM team observed as Signe attempted to shield her son from the rain with an umbrella-like cover she had fashioned from leaves.

With no sign the torrential rain was going to let up, the PRM team had to call it a day and head back to camp. We were delighted to have caught up with Signe, Bungaran, and Bungan, and in particular to see them in such great condition and adapting well to life in the wild.

Text by: PRM team in Camp Nles Mamse , Kehje Sewen Forest

You can support our monitoring team. DONATE NOW to BOS Foundation!

[BABY BULLETIN] Baby Jacqui Moves to New Baby House

Who could forget baby Jacqui, the beautiful little girl we rescued on January 12. Jacqui was found in Pilang village malnourished, injured and without her mother (read the full story here). Tragically we believe her mother was killed leaving Jacqui, like so many of our orangutans, orphaned.

After eight months of rehabilitation in our Orangutan Reintroduction center at Nyaru Menteng, Jacqui is now a very healthy 1 and half year old baby, weighing 5.9 kilograms. She is extremely independent and loves to climb trees and build nests from leaves and twigs. In the Nursery Group, Jacqui is very close to another orphaned baby Bumi (which means “earth” in Bahasa Indonesia); whenever Bumi gets scared, Jacqui is always there to comfort him and give him a hug like a doting big sister.

Jacqui and 15 other baby orangutan, including Mema, Zahri and Kalanis, love their new Baby House and we are so delighted to have been able to build this home with your support. Thank you for helping our babies learn and grown on their journey to freedom!

Text by: BOS Foundation HQ Communication Team 

You can make a difference right now and help save orangutans! DONATE NOW

#OrangutanDay of Freedom: BOS Foundation Marks International Orangutan Day with Public Event

The BOS Foundation, together with the support of some of Indonesia’s most-loved celebrities, isholding a public event to commemorate both Independence Day of the Republic of Indonesia andInternational Orangutan Day, and to highlight the orangutan and habitat conservation effort.

 

Jakarta, August 20th, 2017:The BOS Foundation, winner of the ‘Brand of the Year – Animalis Edition 2017-2018’ award, will celebrate the 72nd Independence Day of the Republic of Indonesia, as well as mark International Orangutan Day, which falls on August 19 annually, with the #OrangutanDay of Freedom event at fX Sudirman, Jakarta. With the theme #OrangutanFreedom, the event aims to raise awareness and funds for the BOS Foundation’s orangutan and habitat conservation activities in Central and East Kalimantan.

A number of Indonesian celebrities and artists have offered their support and will be joining the event: singers like Nugie, Melanie Subono, Oppie Andaresta, Sivia Azizah, and Ify Alyssa; a number of musical acts, such as Slank, Fade2Black, and Lightcraft; as well as some prominent figures from the arts and entertainment industry, such as Hilbram Dunar, Rukmi Wisnu Wardhani, Davina Veronica, and Riyanni Djangkaru, have either donated some of their private items for sale or will be performing on the day. The #OrangutanDay of Freedom event is part of a series of events organized by the BOS Foundation to mark this year’s International Orangutan Day. Two days prior, Director-General of Natural Resources Conservation and Ecosystem of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, Ir. Wiratno, MSc., inaugurated the BOS Foundation’s new baby house at the Nyaru Menteng Orangutan Rehabilitation Center in Central Kalimantan, which will house 16 orangutan babies from the center’s Nursery group. This baby house is where orangutans aged four years and under will rest every night, after a busy day of climbing and playing in the nearby Forest School area. The #OrangutanDay of Freedom event at fX Sudirman is a collaborative effort between the BOS Foundation and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry (KLHK). Several other parties, including PT. Bank Central Asia Tbk., Fitness First Senayan City, and fX Sudirman Jakarta, will support the event and help highlight the orangutan and habitat conservation issue to the residents of Jakarta.

Dr. Ir. Jamartin Sihite, BOS Foundation CEO said, “Every day, we receive questions about orangutans, from both people abroad and from our fellow citizens. We can see there is considerably increasing interest from the public about orangutans and the habitat conservation effort. But we want to inform everyone and stress to them that as long as we, humans, need clean air, clean water, and a regulated climate, and if we want to avoid rivers flooding and landslides from occurring, then humans need to maintain the existence and quality of our remaining forests. And that nature has actually given us a great preserver of the forests: orangutans! Orangutans spread seeds and open the forest canopy to let sunlight reach the forest floor so plants can grow. So the key to forest conservation is actually orangutan safety.”

“The presence of our friends from the arts and entertainment industry here today, giving support to our cause, is a tremendously joyous thing. They have many followers, are role models to many, and inspire many people. Hopefully the participation of these great friends of the BOS Foundation can inspire more community members out there to help save orangutans and their habitats. “To mark the occasion, PT. Bank Central Asia (BCA) Tbk. will symbolically hand over a donation to support the various orangutan and habitat conservation activities undertaken by the BOS Foundation. BCA has provided moral and financial support to a number of BOS Foundation activities since 2013.

Inge Setiawati, Executive Vice President Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) PT. Bank Central Asia Tbk., said, “BCA, through its CSR program, has provided support for the orangutan and habitat conservation efforts undertaken by the BOS Foundation, as we believe that wild animals such as orangutans should live freely in their natural habitats. We also believe that greater support can be provided by the general public. Therefore, on this day, BCA supports this awareness-raising public event. We very much hope that by holding such events, Indonesians will become more aware of the importance of saving orangutans and their habitats.”

Minister of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, Dr. Ir. Siti Nurbaya Bakar, MSc., also gave full support to orangutan conservation efforts, including this awareness-raising public event.

Dr. Ir. Siti Nurbaya Bakar, MSc., Minister of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, offered her support for the orangutan conservation effort, and said: “We at the Ministry of Environment and Forestry want to remind everyone that our forests and forest biodiversity are invaluable assets, not only for us in Indonesia, but for all mankind. Good quality forests support the lives of all living things, including humans. Therefore, I and all the staff of the ministerial office will always try as hard as possible to preserve these assets. We at the Ministry welcome all conservation efforts undertaken by organizations, groups, and individuals, including the orangutan and habitat conservation effort by the BOS Foundation. We are aware that this conservation effort cannot be carried out partially and individually. All of us, including the central and local governments, communities, community groups, the private sector, and both environmental and social organisations, are stakeholders. We all benefit from the existence of sustainable forests. Let us work hand in hand to create a sustainable forest and well-preserved biodiversity for the sake of our future generations. “Founded in 1991, the BOS Foundation works to rescue orangutans in Kalimantan, particularly in Central and East Kalimantan provinces, and focuses its activities on rescue, rehabilitation and release efforts, as well as long-term conservation of orangutan populations and their habitats. After a decade of unsuccessful orangutan release to natural forests, the BOS Foundation managed to overcome a huge obstacle by obtaining a permit for the management of a forest area and immediately recommenced its orangutan release program in 2012. Since then, the BOS Foundation has released 301 orangutans back to the forests of Borneo. The BOS Foundation expresses its gratitude to the parties that have helped this event take place: fX Sudirman, for providing a great venue; Fitness First Senayan City; and all stakeholders for their support and contribution to the conservation of this critically endangered species.

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Contact:

Djati Witjaksono Hadi

Head of Public Relations Bureau The Ministry of Environment and Forestry

Email: djatiwhadi@yahoo.com

PT. Bank Central Asia Tbk.

Corporate Secretary Division – Corporate Communication Sub Division

Public Relation Bureau

Jl. MH Thamrin No. 1 BCA Grand Indonesia lt.20, Jakarta Pusat

Email: humas@bca.co.id

Paulina Laurensia Ela

BOSF Communication Specialist

Email: pauline@orangutan.or.id

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Editor’s Note:

ABOUT BOS FOUNDATION

Founded in 1991, the BOS Foundation is a non-profit Indonesian organization dedicated to the conservation of Bornean orangutans and their natural habitats, working together with local communities, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, and international partner organizations.

The BOS Foundation currently has around 650 orangutans in two rehabilitation centres, with support from 440 highly dedicated staff and experts in the fields of primatology, biodiversity, ecology, forest rehabilitation, agroforestry, community empowerment, communications, education, and orangutan welfare. For further information, please visit www.orangutan.or.id.

[BABY BULLETIN] 16 Orangutan Babies Celebrate Independence Day in Their New Baby House!

Following a year-long campaign and several months of construction, the brand new Baby House at the BOS Foundation’s Orangutan Reintroduction Center in Nyaru Menteng (Nyaru Menteng) is finally ready to accommodate our baby orangutans from the Nursery Group. A day after Independence Day of the Republic of Indonesia, our sixteen babies have a new home!

In response to all of the new arrivals, BOS Foundation launched a fund-raising campaign to build a new Baby House in December 2015 and commenced construction in mid-2016. BOS Foundation has built new Baby Houses in both of our orangutan rehabilitation centers: Nyaru Menteng in Central Kalimantan and Samboja Lestari in East Kalimantan.

The new Baby House is equipped with an indoor playground and enrichment facilities as well as a special Forest School located less than 100 meters away designed for the Nursery Group orangutans. After a 20-month wait, baby orangutans in Nyaru Menteng will finally be able to enjoy the new facilities and comfort of their new home.

Huge thanks to all who supported this beautiful home!

Text by: BOS Foundation HQ Communication Team 

You can make a difference right now and help save orangutans! DONATE NOW

Noor, Queen of the Jungle

For many months we had tried to track and observe Noor. This impressive female with a dark face and long hair had proven to be very difficult to locate; first, because her radio tracking device had become inactive; and second, because she had cleverly learned to evade us.

You could say that Noor’s personality is more like that of the Queen of Hearts than Alice – she often gets upset at observers and will chase them away to keep them out of her wonderland. Luckily for us, she showed up this month and honored us with her presence for a few days.

The Queen of Hearts hangs on the tree

When we spotted Noor from our boats along the river bank, she had already seen us first and was observing us intently. Keeping a close eye on us and watching every move we made, anybody would think Noor was the one observing and taking notes on us! She hid behind a log and took fleeting glances at her human visitors, just as they would have done to observe her.

Clearly we weren’t very exciting to watch and she soon got bored and started grooming herself. This is when we started to learn the secrets behind Noor’s beauty: looking fit and healthy, she took her time to very carefully prime every single strand of her lustrous hair. After completing her hair regime, the majestic red queen suddenly became a goofy Alice. Oblivious to her size, Noor moved off through the forest choosing branches too small to hold her weight, which cracked and broke in her wake. She picked up speed in an effort to stop herself from falling, but after three broken branches was unable to avoid the inevitable and swiftly fell on her bottom.

Like a queen keeping up appearances before her loyal subjects, Noor glared back at us, as if waiting for us to show her the respect she demanded. With her pride barely intact, Queen Noor turned her back on her human observers and moved off to forage for forest fruits.

Until we meet again, your highness!

Text by: Alizee Martin, PRM Coordinator in Batikap

You can make a difference right now and help save orangutans! DONATE NOW

BOS Foundation, Central Kalimantan BKSDA, Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park (TNBBBR) Agency Release 12 More Orangutans to TNBBBR in Central Kalimantan

In keeping with the #OrangutanFreedom campaign goal of releasing 100 orangutans to conservation forests this year, the BOS Foundation (BOSF), Central Kalimantan BKSDA, and the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park (TNBBBR) Agency have again worked together to release rehabilitated orangutans from Nyaru Menteng.

Twelve orangutans from Nyaru Menteng were released to the TNBBBR in Central Kalimantan in the 18th orangutan release by BOSF Nyaru Menteng. This event takes the total number of rehabilitated orangutans released from Nyaru Menteng to 30 so far this year.

The twelve orangutans included eight females and four males, which were divided into two batches and dispatched on different days. The first batch – Elin, Heidi, Cameron, Geragu, Tubagus, and Tuhe – departed from Nyaru Menteng on August 2, and were released the following day. Meanwhile, the second batch, which included Seruni, Suryani, Mariam, Niken, Pak Edi and Otong, departed on August 4, and were released the next day.

Our release teams sedated the orangutans at around 3 p.m. on the day of departure, then transferred them into transport cages in the Nyaru Menteng quarantine complex, ready for the long journey.

Orangutan health check

The team leaves Nyaru Menteng to TNBBBR

Once the orangutans were checked by a vet, they departed from Nyaru Menteng with the release team. The journey from Nyaru Menteng to the TNBBBR took about six hours by car. As always, our team followed strict protocol throughout the journey; stopping every two hours to check on the orangutans, and offer them food and water.

Checking in on orangutans throughout the trip

Upon reaching Tumbang Tundu Village, the team took small motor boats known locally as ‘ces’ or ‘kelotok’ on a five-hour journey along the river.

On approach at the river bank near camp, the transport cages were lifted one by one from the boats and carried to pre-determined release points located in the TNBBBR. The twelve orangutans were soon released into their natural habitat and could taste true freedom in their new home!

Transferring transport cages from the boats

Malik opens the Geragu’s cage

Agus opens the Tubagus’s cage

The BOS Foundation has released 47 orangutans to the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park. With these 12, the number of orangutans released to the TNBBBR now stands at 59 individuals. This release has increased the total number of orangutans released by the BOS Foundation to 301 orangutans.

 

The BOS Foundation would like to express gratitude for the support of all parties and their contributions to assisting the conservation effort in Indonesia.

Text by: BOS Foundation Communications Team

You can make a difference and help save orangutans! DONATE NOW

[PRESS RELEASE] BOS Foundation and Central Kalimantan BKSDA Release 12 More Orangutans to BBBRNP

Borneo Orangutan Survival (BOS) Foundation, in cooperation with the Central Kalimantan BKSDA, will release another 12 orangutans from the Central Kalimantan Orangutan Reintroduction Center in Nyaru Menteng to the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park (BBBRNP) in Katingan Regency. This will be the sixth release into the national park, and the 18th release by the BOS Foundation in Central Kalimantan since 2012.

Nyaru Menteng, Central Kalimantan, August 2, 2017: To reach our #OrangutanFreedom goals, aimed at reintroducing 100 orangutans to natural habitat this year, BOS Foundation and the Central Kalimantan BKSDA are again collaborating to releaseorangutans back to the wild. Four male and eight female orangutans will be accompanied by a release team on a 10-12 hours road and river trip from Nyaru Menteng to the BBBRNP, where they will be released at predetermined locations. This will bring the total number of rehabilitated orangutans released in the BBBRNP to 59.

BOS Foundation CEO Dr. Ir. Jamartin Sihite, said; “2017 focuses on #OrangutanFreedom, and we aim to release 100 orangutans to the forest this year. With this release, we will reach our halfway release point of fifty orangutans. We are optimistic that with the active support of our stakeholders, including the central and local government, the private sector and organizations dedicated to protecting Indonesia’s natural sources, the target is within our reach. This should not only be the BOS Foundation’s goal, but our collective goal and responsibility to preserve our forests and our wildlife. Hundreds of the orangutans under our care have already completed Forest School, and others are living on our pre-release islands, waiting for their turn to be released to the wild. Orangutans are a vital part of forest ecology. Mankind needs forests to provide clean air and water, and regulate climate, among other functions. Why are we not taking better care of the animals who manage the forests for our very own survival? The way we clear land through burning, hunting wild animals, and depleting our natural resources at such a breakneck speed – all has to stop. I would like to stress if we don’t prioritize conservation, if we don’t conserve nature, humans will not survive. It is as simple as that. We urge everyone to support our cause. Land encroachment, like we are experiencing in Samboja Lestari, East Kalimantan, clearly shows we are not receiving the full support we need to achieve sustainable conservation. Conservation efforts and their success affect all of us, and future generations to come. We founded this organization to ensure a better future for all.”

Ir. Adib Gunawan, Head of Central Kalimantan’s Conservation of Natural Resources Agency (BKSDA), said; “Central Kalimantan BKSDA, as an extension of the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, and together with community stakeholders, is responsible for safeguarding our province’s natural resources. We tirelessly embrace all parties to participate in protecting orangutans, as the pride and iconic umbrella species in Central Kalimantan. One way is to initiate formation of forums, socialization and campaigns, as well as rehabilitation and the reintroduction of orangutans in safe and protected areas and protection of wild orangutan populations. The efforts of BOS Foundation to save, rehabilitate, reintroduce orangutans in Kalimantan to protected forests and conserve wild populations are initiatives that we fully support. We must make sure our children and grandchildren will be able to live in a safe protected natural world.”

Ir. Heru Raharjo, M.P., Head of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park (BBBRNP) in Central Kalimantan and West Kalimantan Regions, said; “Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park, in cooperation with BOS Foundation and the Central Kalimantan BKSDA, has already released 47 orangutans in this area. Today, 12 more orangutans will also gain their freedom. We must keep them protected in the National Park. We continue to conduct regular monitoring missions together with the BOS Foundation team to ensure all released orangutans remain safe in our forests. Our observations thus far have ensured the safety of the orangutans, and have recorded their successful adaptation to life in the wild. I sincerely hope the orangutans released here will establish a new population of wild orangutans, to help sustain ourconservation efforts.”

This release was also supported by USAID LESTARI, which has pledged to help continue orangutan release events to the BBBRNP until 2018, and the Bank Central Asia with their CSR activities, has been extremely supportive in orangutan and habitat conservation efforts undertaken by BOS Foundation.

Rosenda Chandra Kasih, USAID LESTARI’s Central Kalimantan Landscape Coordinatorsaid; “USAID LESTARI warmly welcomes the release conducted in cooperation with BOS Foundation with the target of returning 100 orangutans to new habitat in Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park. Considering that the Bornean orangutan conservation status has reached the alarming ‘critically endangered’ point, it should propel us to act quickly and work in cooperation to conserve and protect orangutans and their habitat. The purpose of this cooperation is to create a new wild orangutan population. We are deeply concerned about the rampant news on how the number of orangutans in this province is rapidly decreasing. It is our collective duty to reverse this threat.”

Inge Setiawati, BCA’s Executive Vice President Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) said, “Our common misconception is that rehabilitation centers offer the best safety for orangutans. Whilst of course it is clear that the best place for wildlife is their natural habitat, the forest. Therefore, BCA strongly supports the BOS Foundation’s activities to reintroduce and conserve orangutans who have completed rehabilitation through the Forest School and pre-release system. The Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park as the current orangutan reintroduction forest is a conservation area, and this area should be safe from future exploitation.”

BOS Foundation acknowledges that successful orangutan and habitat conservation efforts areonly achievable through the participation and active support from all parties: the government, and both the public and private sectors. BOS Foundation works in cooperation with the government at all levels, including the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, the Central Kalimantan Provincial Office, the Katingan Regency Office, the Central Kalimantan BKSDA and the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park office, to help safeguard Bornean orangutans and theirhabitat.

BOS Foundation is also supported by a number of other partners, including the Katingan Regency community; individual donors; partner organizations such as Zoos Victoria and the Commonwealth of Australia through the Department of Environment and Energy and conservation organisations around the world. BOS Foundation is very grateful for the support and contributions offered by these parties to aid the conservation effort in Indonesia.

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Contact:

Paulina Laurensia

Communications Specialist

Email: pauline@orangutan.or.id

 

Monterado Fridman (Agung)

Coordinator of Communications and Education Division of Nyaru Menteng

Email: agungm@orangutan.or.id

 

Rosenda Chandra Kasih

USAID LESTARI Kalimantan Tengah Landscape Coordinator

Email: rosenda.kasih@lestari-Indonesia.org

 

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Editor’s Note:

ABOUT BOS FOUNDATION

Founded in 1991, the BOS Foundation is a non-profit Indonesian organization dedicated to the conservation of Bornean orangutans and their natural habitats, working together with local communities, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry of the Republic of Indonesia, and international partner organizations.

The BOS Foundation currently has around 650 orangutans in two rehabilitation centres, with support from 440 highly dedicated staff and experts in the fields of primatology, biodiversity, ecology, forest rehabilitation, agroforestry, community empowerment, communications, education, and orangutan welfare. For further information, please visit www.orangutan.or.id.

 

ABOUT USAID LESTARI

USAID LESTARI is a collaborative project between the governments of the United States of America and the Republic of Indonesia. USAID LESTARI fully supports the efforts made by the Indonesian government to reduce greenhouse emissions and increase conservation of the biodiversity of forests and mangrove ecosystems rich in carbon storage.

USAID LESTARI focuses on regions with unscathed primary forests, high carbon deposits and a rich biodiversity. These regions include Aceh (the Leuser landscape), Central Kalimantan (the Katingan-Kahayan landscape), and Papua (the Lorentz Lowlands, Mappi-Bouven Digoel, Sarmi and Cyclops landscapes).

NYARU MENTENG 18th ORANGUTAN RELEASE CANDIDATE PROFILES

In line with the #OrangutanFreedom campaign that aims to introduce 100 orangutans to natural habitat this year, the BOS Foundation today is releasing another batch of 12 orangutans into the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park Forest in Katingan Regency, Central Kalimantan. Here are the profiles of those twelve orangutans.

1. TUHE

Tuhe was confiscated from a resident of Tumbang Mantuhe village, Gunung Mas Regency, Central Kalimantan, and taken to Nyaru Menteng on April 15, 2004. He was only 18 months old at the time, weighed 4.4 kilograms, and was in a very poor condition. Dehydrated and thin from malnutrition, Tuhe had skinny limbs and a protruding stomach, and his left arm showed signs of injury.

After passing a mandatory period of quarantine, Tuhe entered Forest School to begin his rehabilitation. He went through all the stages of Forest School and graduated to the pre-release stage on Kaja Island, where he was moved on July 5, 2015.

Tuhe, who has become a good forager, is now 15 years old and weighs 43.7 kilograms. He likes to roam far, and has grown into a handsome individual with a trademark part in the middle of his hair. After 13 years of rehabilitation at Nyaru Menteng, Tuge is ready to experience the natural habitat of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

2. TUBAGUS

Tubagus was rescued on August 17, 2005, after being kept illegally as a pet by a local resident of Mantangai Village, in Kapuas Regency. He arrived at Nyaru Menteng severely malnourished and dehydrated, and was an underweight 2.5-year-old at only 5.5 kilograms.

Tubagus worked through the rehabilitation stages of Forest School and was moved to the pre-release habitat of Bangamat Island in February 2015. A keen explorer, he was rarely seen around the feeding platform, preferring instead to forage for forest food. While not an aggressive orangutan by nature, Tubagus is nonetheless very good at reading situations and is able to defend himself when required.

Tubagus is now 15 years old with a thin beard, and weighs 47.4 kilograms. After 12 years of rehabilitation, Tubagus will soon become a true wild orangutan alongside his close female friend, Geragu.

3. OTONG

Otong was rescued from Parenggean Village, Kotawaringin Timur Regency, Central Kalimantan, in June 2003. He was two years old at the time and weighed only 5.5 kilograms.

Curious Otong progressed through the stages of Forest School, and in 2015 was moved to the pre-release habitat of Bangamat Island, where he becamea skilful forager.

Now a handsome, long-haired 16-year-old weighing 41.1 kilograms, Otong is more than ready to taste freedom in the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

4. CAMERON

Cameron was confiscated from a resident of Parenggean Village in Kotawaringin Timur Regency on April 14, 2004, through a joint-team effort between the Central Kalimantan BKSDA and the BOS Foundation. This tiny female arrived at Nyaru Menteng in a very poor condition, aged around 18 months and weighing 6.5 kilograms.

After moving through several stages of Forest School, Cameron graduated and advanced to the pre-release stage on Kaja Island in June 2013. She spent a lot of time on Kaja exploring her surroundings and making friends with her fellow inhabitants.

Cameron is now 15 years old and weighs 37.3 kilograms. After 13 years of rehabilitation, and with the experiences gained from her time on a pre-release island, she is now ready to explore the forests of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park as a true wild orangutan.

5. MARIAM

Mariam was brought to Nyaru Menteng after being confiscated from a resident of Sebabi Village, Kotawaringin Timur Regency, Central Kalimantan, on May 29, 2009. At the time she was just three years old and weighed 16 kilograms.

This gentle and charming girl with an oval face and round eyes, graduated from Forest School in March 2014 to continue her rehabilitation process on pre-release Kaja Island, where she was a curious explorer.

Armed with a sound survival skillset gained over her eight years of rehabilitation at Nyaru Menteng, Mariam is more than ready to return to a natural habitat. Now 11 years old and weighing 32.3 kilograms, Mariam is destined to become a great explorer in the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

6. GERAGU

Geragu arrived at Nyaru Menteng on August 20, 2004, aged two years and weighing 5.3 kilograms. She was rescued in a joint-team effort between the BOS Foundation Nyaru Menteng and the Central Kalimantan BKSDA, from a resident of Geragu Village, Katingan Regency, Central Kalimantan, who was keeping her illegally as a pet.

An intelligent individual, Geragu thrived throughout her Forest School years and quickly built up a sound skillset. After graduating from Forest School, she was transferred to Kaja Island in February 2016, to test her survival skills in a natural habitat.

An avid explorer, Geragu is now 15 years old and weighs 44.3 kilograms. After 13 years of rehabilitation and honing her skills at Nyaru Menteng, Geragu is now ready to explore the forests of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park with her good friend, Tubagus.

7. HEIDI

Heidi arrived at Nyaru Menteng after being rescued from a local villager in Henda, Pulang Pisau Regency, Central Kalimantan, on October 20, 2006. She was 2.5 years old and weighed only 4.1 kilograms.

Charming, narrow-eyed Heidi progressed through the stages of Forest School and moved to the pre-release rehabilitation stage on Kaja Island in July 2015. On Kaja Island, Heidi proved to be a kind individual that easily socialized with other orangutans.

Now 14 years old and weighing 35.4 kilograms, Heidi has learned all that she can from her 11 years of rehabilitation and is fully prepared to live as a true wild orangutan in the forest.

8. PAK EDI

Pak Edi was confiscated from a local resident in Jakarta on July 19, 2003. He was only three years old at the time of his rescue and weighed 7.5 kilograms.

Following a routine period of quarantine, Pak Edi joined Forest School to being his rehabilitation. In February 2016, he entered the final pre-release stage of rehabilitation and was moved to Kaja Island, where he enjoyed exploring and foraging for termites – one of his favourite foods.

Pak Edi is now 14 years old and weighs 50.6 kilograms. During his time at Nyaru Menteng, he learned all the skills required to survive in a true, wild forest. Pak Edi will soon get the chance to live free in the wilderness of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

9. SURYANI

Suryani was confiscated from a resident of Pangkalan Bun, Kotawaringin Barat Regency, Central Kalimantan. She arrived at Nyaru Menteng on April 16, 2007, when she was two years old and weighed 8.5 kilograms.

After passing all the Forest School stages, gentle and sociable Suryani continued her road to rehabilitation on pre-release Bangamat Island in November 2014. Her foraging skills improved significantly during her time on Bangamat, and bark became her favourite food.

Suryani is now 12 years old and weighs 29.15 kilograms. After 10 years of rehabilitation, Suryani is ready to put all of her skills to the test in a true, wild forest.

10. NIKEN

Niken arrived at Wanariset Samboja on July 13, 1999, after being handed over to the BOS Foundation by the Banjarmasin BKSDA. At the time she was just two years old and weighed eight kilograms.

During her training in Samboja Lestari’s Forest School, Niken was a very active and smart student that always strived to learn new survival skills. She formed a close relationship with Leke, who was released to the Kehje Sewen Forest, in East Kalimantan, in March 2014. On April 18, 2014, Niken was transferred to Nyaru Menteng, after being identified as a Pongo pygmaeus wurmbiisubspecies of Bornean Orangutans.

After three years at Nyaru Menteng, Niken can now finally walk the same path as her pal Leke, and live as a true, wild orangutan. Now 20 years old and weighing 52.1 kilograms, Niken is ready to experience life in the forests of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

11. SERUNI

Seruni was rescued from an oil palm plantation area near Parenggean Village, Kotawaringin Timur Regency, Central Kalimantan, on October 16, 2006. She was two years old at the time and weighed seven kilograms.

After graduating from Forest School, round-eyed Seruni was placed on Bangamat Island to begin her pre-release stage of rehabilitation in November 2014. She liked to explore all over the island, and made lots of friends thanks to her sound socialization skills.

Seruni is now 13 years old and weighs 35.9 kilograms. After 11 years of working through all the stages of rehabilitation, Seruni is now ready to explore the wilderness of the Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park – her new home.

12. ELIN

Elin was rescued on October 15, 2006, from residents of Parenggean Village, Kotawaringin Timur Regency, Central Kalimantan, who had held her captive for two months. She was brought to Nyaru Menteng in good health when she was 2.5 years old and weighed seven kilograms.

In February 2015, Elin started her pre-release process on Kaja Island after completing all the stages of Forest School. On Kaja, highly curious Elin honed her skills and adapted with ease to her new environment and friends.

Elin is now 14 years old and weighs 36.2 kilograms. After nearly 11 years of rehabilitation at Nyaru Menteng, Elin is ready to prove she can live as a true, wild orangutan in the wilds of Central Kalimantan’s Bukit Baka Bukit Raya National Park.

Seven More Gain Freedom in Kehje Sewen

Working towards our #OrangutanFreedom goal, we are delighted to report that we have successfully released another seven rehabilitated orangutans to the Kehje Sewen Forest in East Kutai Regency!

Journey to Freedom

On July 11, the Samboja Lestari medical team sedated Abel and her son Alejandro, followed by Imut and her son Ical; Belinda and adoptee Maureen; and finally, big Kumar. An hour later, the seven sleeping orangutans were placed into transportation cages and loaded onto vehicles, ready to depart for the 13th orangutan release in the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Once sedated, technicians lifted every orangutans to put into the transport cage

Orangutans in transport cages were loaded onto the waiting pickup trucks

A convoy of five pickup trucks and one MPV left Samboja Lestari shortly after 2 p.m. and headed to the small town of Muara Wahau in East Kutai Regency. Our team followed strict protocols throughout the journey; stopping every two hours to check on the orangutans and offer them food and water.

Our Medical and Animal Welfare Team ensures that each and every orangutans are in the best travelling condition

The convoy reached the BOSF-RHOI office in Muara Wahau 13 hours later, in the very early hours of July 12. After a short break the team continued on the final leg of the trip to reach the forest before sunrise. It took another five hours to reach the last point accessible by vehicle, 200 meters from the banks of the Telen River.

Then the cages were carried down to the river bank and transported across the river using a ces (small boat).

The whole team works hard to carry the transport cages to the predetermined release points

Once they reached their destination, the cages were loaded onto two waiting 4×4 vehicles that carried them to release points deep in the southern part of the Kehje Sewen Forest.

Update from the Kehje Sewen Forest!

On July 12, at approximately 3.30 p.m., the BOS Foundation headquarters received a short message from Nles Mamse Camp confirming that the seven orangutans had been successfully released to the forest. As previously planned, the first cage opened was Belinda’s, followed by Maureen’s: the two have shared a mother-child like bond ever since meeting on a pre-release island. Abel and Alejandro, who travelled in the same cage, were the next to be released. Our huge flanged male, Kumar, was set free next, followed shortly after by Imut and Ical.

Kumar’s transport cage is opened by Jamartin Sihite, BOS Foundation CEO

The last cage to open was Ical’s, done by Syahrul, our Samboja Lestari technician who was known very close to Ical

This release event brings the total number of orangutans released to natural habitat – from both the Samboja Lestari and Nyaru Menteng rehabilitation centers – to 289, with 75 released to the Kehje Sewen Forest.

This reintroduction was only made possible through cooperation with the East Kalimantan BKSDA, the Provincial Government of East Kalimantan, the local governments of East Kutai and Kutai Kartanegara regencies, and the local residents of said regencies. BOS Foundation is extremely grateful for the moral and financial support provided by many parties, partners and non-partner organizations or individuals from around the world concerned with orangutan conservation in Indonesia.

Text by: BOSF Communication Team

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